St. John Fisher Roman Catholic Church

30 Jones Hollow Road, Marlborough, CT 06447

Home! Think of that word and its uses. Home Free. E.T., phone home!  “I’ll be home for Christmas.” Home is where the heart is.

Ideally, home is a place of safety and acceptance. A place where we discover who we are, or can be who we are, without the pressure of having to prove ourselves or be judged in the same way we are at school or at work or even sometimes at play; a place where we do things and help out not for reward or to gain love but because we belong. A place where the routine of daily life and mealtimes and

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Because of his afflictionLENTEN SCRIPTURE PROGRAM

Wednesday, March 13, 7-8 pm
Presented by Father Sas

Who was the Suffering Servant? Was he the prophet speaking about him/herself? Was he a prophet from the past or from the future? Was the Servant an idealized type of Israel? Was he only a mysterious figure meant to keep the People of God guessing or hoping for his arrival?

Find out on March 13.

In preparation, read Isaiah 40-55 completely, preferably at one sitting. Bring a Bible on the 13th.

pastors deskI like Lent.  Really, I do.  Why would I say something so strange?

First of all, because everybody gets on board to try to make their lives better. Something about a common effort to improve shows us that being Church is a team effort. We are not Lone Rangers but a community. We challenge each other; we support each other. We are on this journey to Easter together, even on Sundays—no free days allowed. Why? Because it has been shown that it takes at least 30 consecutive days to make something a habit, a normal way of acting.

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I just heard a talk during which a question was asked: “Why don’t people go to ‘confession’ 1  anymore?”

First of all, is it true? I think it is. I remember hearing confessions for an hour straight almost every Saturday when I was first ordained. Now, it may have been the tradition of that particular parish to go to regular confession, but I noticed the number of confessions have been drastically reduced over the last 37+ years. In fact, on some Saturdays, I read a spiritual book or pray the Breviary uninterrupted. It leads me to suspect that there is little or no sin in Marlborough and in the other parishes I have been recently stationed!

Why has “confession” fallen so out of favor?

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Who could have guessed the Messiah would come from a little town like Bethlehem by way of another insignificant town, Nazareth? Who would have expected a teenaged, unmarried girl would conceive the Savior of the world? Who would hazard a guess that an elderly, barren woman would finally give birth to a son who would be filled with the Holy Spirit and announce the coming Messiah? Who knew?

Our God is still the God of the unexpected and surprises.

We only have to open our eyes and hearts to see and receive them.

4th Sunday of Advent, Year C

Are you an optimist or a realist? To which Infancy Narrative are you more attracted, Luke or Matthew?

Most people prefer Luke’s telling of the birth of Jesus. It’s more familiar to us as we read it every Christmas. He tells of the Annunciation to Mary, her visit to Elizabeth, the trip from Nazareth to Bethlehem, the stable, the manger, angels’ singing, Peace on earth, and  shepherds. Even after the Savior’s birth there is no trouble except what says to Mary at the Presentation.

It’s all light, happiness and joy.

Matthew’s telling of the story of Christ’s birth, on the other hand, has Joseph and Mary living in a house in Bethlehem and the annunciation is told to Joseph. After the quiet birth of Jesus with no fanfare, Matthew has Joseph, Mary and the baby hightail out of Bethlehem going to Egypt to escape the murderous wrath of Herod who gives an order that all innocent children should be killed in the area around Bethlehem.

Matthew is much darker and more sinister, certainly less joyful, and maybe more realistic.

Life and death, light and darkness, joy and sorrow are always present in our lifes, especially this Christmas when our happiness is tempered  by the sadness in Newtown.

But, for today, let’s have smiles. Let us remember that Christ is our light who shines through the darkness and that darkness has not overcome it. 

And, may we be lights for others to help them through their shadows and moments of darkness.

Christmas, 2012

Christmas, 2012

 

Are you an optimist or a realist? To which Infancy Narrative are you more attracted, Luke or Matthew?

Most people prefer Luke’s telling of the birth of Jesus. It’s more familiar to us as we read it every Christmas. He tells of the Annunciation to Mary, her visit to Elizabeth, the trip from Nazareth to Bethlehem, the stable, the manger, angels’ singing, Peace on earth, and  shepherds. Even after the Savior’s birth there is no trouble except what says to Mary at the Presentation.

 It’s all light, happiness and joy.

Matthew’s telling of the story of Christ’s birth, on the other hand, has Joseph and Mary living in a house in Bethlehem and the annunciation is told to Joseph. After the quiet birth of Jesus with no fanfare, Matthew has Joseph, Mary and the baby hightail out of Bethlehem going to Egypt to escape the murderous wrath of Herod who gives an order that all innocent children should be killed in the area around Bethlehem.

Matthew is much darker and more sinister, certainly less joyful, and maybe more realistic.

Life and death, light and darkness, joy and sorrow are always present in our lifes, especially this Christmas when our happiness is tempered  by the sadness in Newtown.

But, for today, let’s have smiles. Let us remember that Christ is our light who shines through the darkness and that darkness has not overcome it.[1]

And, may we be lights for others to help them through their shadows and moments of darkness.

 



[1] Jn. 1:5

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